Did You Like The Bodies Exhibit? Attend the Advanced Anatomy Cadaver Lab!!!

muscle-man-1Through the human cadaver lab, students gain a “hands on” appreciation for normal anatomy and develop an understanding of how the human musculo-skeletal system makes movement possible.  The anatomy lab prepares students for more advanced, clinically oriented work by providing a foundation of knowledge to work with the body through exercise and movement.

Description
Unless you are a physician, much of anatomy training is based on models, illustrations, and “blind faith” about the anatomic relationships necessary to understand the interactions of different muscle groups.  The primary purpose of this course is to solidify these concepts into more tangible associations.

Dr. Carr will conduct an intensive three-hour study of human clinical anatomy that includes:

1      An introduction to basic anatomy.

2      Examination of human muscular anatomy, including the upper and lower extremities, the torso, the neck, and the deep back muscles. Emphasis will be placed on the size and shapes of muscles, the differing lines of contraction of individual muscles, as well as how individual muscles and muscle groups work together.

3      Anatomical differences between cadavers will be illustrated with regard to body type, sex, and age.

4      Palpation of individual muscles will be encouraged, with size and location noted.

5      Strong clinical correlations will be covered regarding muscle, tendon, joint, and fascia problems as they are encountered in clinical practice with amateur and professional athletes.

6      Gross visceral anatomy will be mentioned, with location and function of major organs.  Clinical correlations will be mentioned as it pertains to the cause of death of the cadavers.

7      Gross anatomy of the major peripheral nerves, including the brachial plexus and the sciatic nerve will be taught, while clinical syndromes associated with these structures will be related.

8      A short time will be spent on the major anatomy and function of the brain, brainstem, and spinal cord.

9      Individuals will be encouraged to ask questions, or spend individual time examining the cadavers, as they desire.

Course Faculty
The course has been designed and prepared by a wide range of doctoral healthcare professionals.  Dr. Carr brings together this course material from his experience teaching in the University of Bridgeport’s Chiropractic and Naturopathic programs, as well as cadaver labs taught for the Connecticut Center for Massage Therapy in Westport, CT. In addition Dr. Carr has been in clinical practice for over a decade, and has worked with top Olympic and professional athletes, including over 10 years as a consultant to the Bridgeport Sound Tigers hockey team, top affiliate of the NY Islanders. www.drbrettcarr.com

Prerequisites
In order to maximize the educational value of this program, a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology are helpful. However, regardless of your knowledge level, every attendee with learn an enormous amount from this class.

Date & Time
The next session will be held on April 5, 2014 from 10-1 or  2-5.

Place
University of Bridgeport, College of Chiropractic Cadaver Lab,  75 Linden Street, Bridgeport, CT  06601. We will meet in front of the yellow chiropractic building.

Fee(s)
Individual registration is $100.  Checks should be made payable to “Dr. Brett M. Carr, LLC”.  Payment is required in advance of the course, and may be sent with your name and phone number to: Dr. Brett M. Carr, PO Box 1432, Fairfield, CT 06825. Cash may be brought to the course. For more information, please contact Dr. Carr at 203-258-3013. or e-mail at bmcarr123@gmail.com

www.drbrettcarr.com

 

That Back Pain Might Be Due to a ‘Pain in the Neck’

This interview with Dr. Brett Carr, Chiropractor and Nutritional Specialist in Fairfield, CT, appeared in WAG Magazine.

wag-logoBy Olivia Stumpf

When back pain comes to mind, so might the image of someone hunched over a computer or doing heavy lifting. Although these activities put you at risk for developing back pain, two important and often overlooked causes of discomfort are stress and a sedentary lifestyle.

“One of the paradoxes is that there are rarely physical things that are predictive, but what we call more psychosocial things, like something as simple as job satisfaction,” says Brett Carr, a Fairfield chiropractor. “I can make a better prediction about people with back pain based on their satisfaction with their job than I can just by taking their height or weight.”

In other words, having a satisfying life and engaging in enjoyable activities can both prevent and relieve unwanted pain.

Although patients experiencing stressors may present with specific back problems, others may experience referred pain. These individuals may have hip discomfort or feelings of uneasiness in the buttocks. Perhaps less obvious would be unusual sensations such as stinging down the leg into the foot due to a pinched nerve in the back (sciatica) or groin pain that actually stems from the lower lumbar area of the spine. Such referred pain may make the underlying cause of these symptoms less evident. However, with treatment, it’s possible to retrace the body’s maze to discover the real culprit – the back.

Carr makes an analogy to his patients: “No one complains about a new car… but put 100,000 or 200,000 miles on it and you’ll have all sorts of problems.”

The same can be said of back care. Without managing stress or engaging in proper maintenance, back pain can surface.

Activity – whether sports or a discipline such as yoga – is the biggest protector against experiencing unwanted symptoms.

Carr-470-wplok“It’s a use it or lose it kind of world,” says Carr, who has been the chiropractic consultant to the New York Islanders’ affiliate Bridgeport Sound Tigers hockey team since 2000 and teaches at the University of Bridgeport College of Chiropractic. “If you want to be able to walk, you have to be walking. If you want to be able to lift, you have to be lifting.”

By strengthening the core, releasing pent-up tension and maintaining equilibrium, exercise facilitates alignment physically and psychologically.

For individuals whose daily activities are affected by back pain, treatment is usually warranted. Tailoring her approach to the individual, chiropractor Lisa Clyne of Westport uses a variety of therapeutic techniques, including drop tables for a gentle spinal adjustment or the more aggressive Graston Technique to break up tough scar tissue. Site-specific flexion distraction is incorporated to help pump up herniated discs, while therapeutic ultrasound can be applied to connective tissue such as ligaments and tendons to decrease inflammation.

Massage therapy and acupuncture are becoming more commonplace in chiropractic care. These give the body a boost by increasing circulation and blood flow, delivering oxygen more readily to organs, reducing swelling and improving overall function.

Many different treatments can be effective in relieving “tech neck” – caused by looking down at a computer screen for several hours a day. Clyne also notes that texting has a similar effect.

“(People) hold the hand-held device down instead of straight in front of their eyes, so they flex their necks and they come in with tight shoulders and pecs, and their backs hurt.”

Although back pain affects millions of Americans, it is commonly viewed as an injury. As a result, it’s coupled with fear. But it shouldn’t be, experts say. It’s a manageable condition that can be prevented and treated effectively.

Advanced Anatomy Cadaver Lab on April 28th and 29th

Did You Like The Bodies Exhibit?
Attend the Advanced Anatomy Cadaver Lab!!!

Introduction

Through the human cadaver lab, students gain a “hands on” appreciation for normal anatomy and develop an understanding of how the human musculo-skeletal system makes movement possible. The anatomy lab prepares students for more advanced, clinically oriented work by providing a foundation of knowledge to work with the body through exercise and movement.

Description

Unless you are a physician, much of anatomy training is based on models, illustrations, and “blind faith” about the anatomic relationships necessary to understand the interactions of different muscle groups. The primary purpose of this course is to solidify these concepts into more tangible associations.
Dr. Carr will conduct an intensive three-hour study of human clinical anatomy that includes:

  • An introduction to basic anatomy.
  • Examination of human muscular anatomy, including the upper and lower extremities, the torso, the neck, and the deep back muscles. Emphasis will be placed on the size and shapes of muscles, the differing lines of contraction of individual muscles, as well as how individual muscles and muscle groups work together.
  • Anatomical differences between cadavers will be illustrated with regard to body type, sex, and age.
  • Palpation of individual muscles will be encouraged, with size and location noted.
  • Strong clinical correlations will be covered regarding muscle, tendon, joint, and fascia problems as they are encountered in clinical practice with amateur and professional athletes.
  • Gross visceral anatomy will be mentioned, with location and function of major organs. Clinical correlations will be mentioned as it pertains to the cause of death of the cadavers.
  • Gross anatomy of the major peripheral nerves, including the brachial plexus and the sciatic nerve will be taught, while clinical syndromes associated with these structures will be related.
  • A short time will be spent on the major anatomy and function of the brain, brainstem, and spinal cord.
  • Individuals will be encouraged to ask questions, or spend individual time examining the cadavers, as they desire.

Course Faculty

The course has been designed and prepared by a wide range of doctoral healthcare professionals. Dr. Carr brings together this course material from his experience teaching in the University of Bridgeport’s Chiropractic and Naturopathic programs, as well as cadaver labs taught for the Connecticut Center for Massage Therapy in Westport, CT. In addition Dr. Carr has been in clinical practice for over a decade, and has worked with top Olympic and professional athletes, including 10 years as a consultant to the Bridgeport Sound Tigers hockey team, top affiliate of the NY Islanders.

Prerequisites Date & Time

In order to maximize the educational value of this program, a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology are helpful. However, regardless of your knowledge level, every attendee with learn an enormous amount from this class.

The next session will be held on April 28th and 29th from 10:00-1:00.

Place

University of Bridgeport, College of Chiropractic Cadaver Lab
75 Linden Street, Bridgeport, CT 06601

Fee(s)

Individual registration is $100. Checks should be made payable to “Dr. Brett M. Carr, LLC”. Payment may be made by credit card in person or by phone by calling Joann at 203-256-9971. Payment is required in advance of the course, and may be sent with your name and number to: Dr. Brett M. Carr, 1700 Post Road, Suite C-16, Fairfield, CT 06824. Group discounts are available. For more information, please contact Dr. Carr at 203-256-9971 when actual numbers are known.

Attend the Advanced Anatomy Cadaver Lab on November 19th

Did You Like The Bodies Exhibit?
Attend the Advanced Anatomy Cadaver Lab!!!

Introduction

Through the human cadaver lab, students gain a “hands on” appreciation for normal anatomy and develop an understanding of how the human musculo-skeletal system makes movement possible.  The anatomy lab prepares students for more advanced, clinically oriented work by providing a foundation of knowledge to work with the body through exercise and movement.

Description

Unless you are a physician, much of anatomy training is based on models, illustrations, and “blind faith” about the anatomic relationships necessary to understand the interactions of different muscle groups.  The primary purpose of this course is to solidify these concepts into more tangible associations.
Dr. Carr will conduct an intensive three-hour study of human clinical anatomy that includes:

  • An introduction to basic anatomy.
  • Examination of human muscular anatomy, including the upper and lower extremities, the torso, the neck, and the deep back muscles. Emphasis will be placed on the size and shapes of muscles, the differing lines of contraction of individual muscles, as well as how individual muscles and muscle groups work together.
  • Anatomical differences between cadavers will be illustrated with regard to body type, sex, and age.
  • Palpation of individual muscles will be encouraged, with size and location noted.
  • Strong clinical correlations will be covered regarding muscle, tendon, joint, and fascia problems as they are encountered in clinical practice with amateur and professional athletes.
  • Gross visceral anatomy will be mentioned, with location and function of major organs.  Clinical correlations will be mentioned as it pertains to the cause of death of the cadavers.
  • Gross anatomy of the major peripheral nerves, including the brachial plexus and the sciatic nerve will be taught, while clinical syndromes associated with these structures will be related.
  • A short time will be spent on the major anatomy and function of the brain, brainstem, and spinal cord.
  • Individuals will be encouraged to ask questions, or spend individual time examining the cadavers, as they desire.

Course Faculty

The course has been designed and prepared by a wide range of doctoral healthcare professionals.  Dr. Carr brings together this course material from his experience teaching in the University of Bridgeport’s Chiropractic and Naturopathic programs, as well as cadaver labs taught for the Connecticut Center for Massage Therapy in Westport, CT. In addition Dr. Carr has been in clinical practice for over a decade, and has worked with top Olympic and professional athletes, including 10 years as a consultant to the Bridgeport Sound Tigers hockey team, top affiliate of the NY Islanders.

PrerequisitesDate & Time

In order to maximize the educational value of this program, a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology are helpful. However, regardless of your knowledge level, every attendee with learn an enormous amount from this class.

The next session will be held on November 19, 2011 from 10-1 or 2-5pm.

Place

University of Bridgeport, College of Chiropractic Cadaver Lab
75 Linden Street, Bridgeport, CT  06601

Fee(s)

Individual registration is $100.  Checks should be made payable to “Dr. Brett M. Carr, LLC”.  Payment may be made by credit card in person or by phone by calling Joann at 203-256-9971. Payment is required in advance of the course, and may be sent with your name and number to: Dr. Brett M. Carr, 1700 Post Road, Suite C-16, Fairfield, CT 06824. Group discounts are available. For more information, please contact Dr. Carr at 203-256-9971 when actual numbers are known.